Successive, well respected, UK-based social surveys have, for the past 30 years, been telling us that the proportion of UK adults identifying themselves as having no religion has increased from about 30% to just over 50%. The accuracy of the 50% figure was reinforced when (last December, 2015) the Woolf Institute – which studies relations between Christians, Muslims and Jews – published the results of its Church of England sponsored ‘Commission on Religion and Belief in British Public Life’. Their findings were consistent with today’s 50:50 equilibrium! Between our 2006 and 2013 AGMs, Oxford Humanists’ (OxHums’) membership grew a lot faster than the national average:Read More →

Preamble The 2011 Census recorded that almost a third of Oxford’s citizens didn’t have a religion. Yet we humanists are still largely treated by the establishment as little more than a fringe organisation and, at best, only mentioned as a tag-on to the well-known phrase “All Faiths (and none)”. Fortunately, the tag-on has at least enabled us to be given as much status over the past 2 years as other world religions during the annual [essentially Christian] Remembrance Sunday services. But few of you, I suspect, feel that this recognition is sufficient recognition for the over 30% of all local people we – in manyRead More →

Our beliefs As humanists, we make sense of the world using reason, experience and shared human values. We regard religions, and their doctrines and rituals, as human inventions. We take personal responsibility for our actions and believe that we can all live good lives without religion. We neither fear judgement, nor expect reward, in an afterlife. We find enough purpose and meaning in life itself. The Objects of the Group shall be: To Promote Humanism; To enable Humanists to meet together; To act as the local representative body of the National and International Humanist MovementRead More →