Audiobooks

Librivox

A huge project to convert all out of copyright works into audio format. Contains many classics of philosophy or religion as well as poetry and fiction, all available in various audio formats for free.

Open Culture

Download hundreds of free audio books, mostly classics, to your MP3 player or computer. You’ll find great works of fiction, poetry, and non-fiction, by such authors as Twain, Tolstoy, Hemingway, Orwell, Vonnegut, Nietzsche, Austen, Shakespeare, Asimov, HG Wells & more. Also please see the related collection: 800 Free eBooks for iPad, Kindle & Other Devices.

Listening Books

– seems to be mostly fiction but may be some interesting old classics to stream or download to listen to free

 Loyal Books

Hundreds of audio books available free, to stream or download

Library Books

If you are a member of a public library there are several online apps and services which allow you to ‘borrow’ e-books AND audiobooks on your phone or portable device. These include Libby, Borrowbox, Overdrive, and are available from your iStore, Windows market or Linux app store for free. Try one of these, to access your local library service’s collection of online resources.

Podcasts (audio feeds)

The radio shows and podcasts listed provide useful listening for our varied fields of interest. Some of these are US based, and so often dealing with issues of no immediate relevance to those of us based in Oxford, UK but many programmes cover topics of general interest too, and are worth subscribing to via iTunes or direct from the source site. (disclaimer: some of these podcasts may have stopped running, and so not worth subscribing, but their archives may be of interest):

Please, let me know of any podcasts you have found which might fit here.

Humanist songs

In addition to making fun of fundamentalism, Tim Minchin has also produced two songs that could be described as humanist hymns.

Local humanist, John Webster, made his own “piece of Indian history with relevance to contemporary Islam”, which was banned by BBC Radio Oxford!

Or try the upbeat songs of Shelley Segal.

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